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Latest News and Updates

March 2020

  • Easter CRAFT

    Published 31/03/20
    Please see the attachment below for some nice art and craft Easter activities suitable for all ages at Crossdale.
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  • Doodlemaths Spring Challenge

    Published 29/03/20
    How to take part The DoodleMaths Challenge is taking place from Wednesday 1st April and Thursday 30th April. During this time: Children need to… • Earn a 7-day streak • and 400 stars   Why not print off our Ch
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  • Update for all families 27/3/20

    Published 28/03/20

    Dear Parents and Carers,

    We hope you are well and adjusting to the new situation we all find ourselves in.

    Please see the 2 attachments below:

    • A letter to your children from the whole staff team - please read it to them so they know we are thinking about them.
    • A newsletter for parents with some tips and reminders about supporting your children's learning at home.

    If you have any questions at all, contact your child's class teacher using the new class emails, or use contact@crossdale.notts.sch.uk for general enquiries.

    Kind regards,

    Peter Cresswell

    Class emails for home learning enquiries:

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  • EXTRA SUPPORT FOR YOUR CHILDREN

    Published 25/03/20

    This resource has been produced especially for children with Special Educational Needs/Additional Needs.  However, many resources are beneficial for ALL children.

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  • PASSWORD HELP FOR SCHOOL APPS

    Published 25/03/20

    Has your child lost or forgotten their password for one of the apps we have access to?

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  • Social Distancing

    Published 23/03/20

    We have been told this evening that groups of primary school aged children in Keyworth have been congregating and ignoring government pleas to 'socially distance' themselves.

    Please talk to your children about this - this video and this video might help. 

     

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  • Update for parents using childcare at Crossdale from Monday

    Published 21/03/20

    This information is for the Critical Workers, and parents of vulnerable children, whose children require childcare from Monday. This does not affect the families whose children will not be attending school from Monday.

    From Monday, the childcare provision for Crossdale and Keyworth Primary and Nursery School will be based at the Crossdale Primary site. The Keyworth Primary site will be closed to children.

    We have taken this decision as it gives us the best chance of staying open in a safe and clean building for as long as possible. We are already seeing the impact of Covid-19 on our ability to keep our schools operating smoothly. As one example, Notts County Council can no longer provide cover when a cleaner is absent due to sickness – last week this meant teachers arrived at 7am to clean parts of the school at Crossdale. It seems inevitable that staff availability will reduce further in the coming weeks. Pre-existing medical conditions and illness means our staffing complement in both schools has already been reduced.  Having 2 site managers, 2 cleaners, 2 cooks, 2 sets of admin staff, more teachers, more first aiders, more safeguarding leads and more specialist TAs will ensure the children can continue to come to school and have a safe and positive experience.

    In making this decision, our one priority was to ensure we can stay open safely for as long as possible.

    Many other local schools are already making similar contingency plans to work together in hubs based at one school. Our close partnership between KPNS and Crossdale means we have been able to implement this more quickly than others.

    Mr Cresswell and Mrs Westie will be on the gate as normal to greet the children when they arrive on Monday morning and Crossdale staff members will be ready to welcome the children into the school. There will be a Crossdale staff member in every classroom working with a KPNS staff member on Monday, and we plan to continue this for the rest of the week.

    Staff from both schools have been working incredibly hard to plan engaging activities for all the children - we are hoping that they will all return home on Monday evening talking about their new friends and the positive day they have had.

    All children should NOT come to school in uniform on Monday. Children should wear clothes that will allow them to join in with the sporting challenges Miss Robinson and Mr Sanders has planned for them. Outdoor activities and sport will be a feature of every day, so uniform will not be required at all from Monday.

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  • School Closure Update 3

    Published 21/03/20

    Many thanks for reading and responding to the blog posts we put out yesterday – your responses really helped us plan our provision for next week.

    If your child will now be at home for the foreseeable future, please keep checking the website (there’s some great advice here) and make sure they know how much they will be missed in school. School staff were very emotional yesterday at the prospect of not seeing your wonderful children in the weeks to come!

    If you weren’t able to read the information we sent out yesterday, you should probably read the two blog posts from yesterday (linked at the bottom of this page) before continuing with this one!

    The children of Critical Workers and children classed as vulnerable may be in school next week to access childcare. Guidance about Critical Workers can be found here and guidance about vulnerable children can be found here.

    We have already spoken and made arrangements with several parents about next week and many parents have already booked and agreed childcare. However, we are aware that we have sent a lot of information. Here is a quick summary so you can check you haven’t missed anything:

    • If you are a Critical Worker and you completed the booking form – send the children on the days you booked.
    • If you are a Critical Worker who requires childcare, but we didn’t text you the booking link, email us.
    • Email us if you have any questions about how the vulnerable children guidance relates to your child.

    We will update you with practical arrangements for next week later today. If you are accessing childcare in school next week, please read this update and email us if you have any questions.

    Email: contact@crossdale.notts.sch.uk

    Please note that Windmills Childcare will continue to operate if you require the service. Parents accessing this service will be invoiced in the normal way. Email us if we can help you access the services Windmills Childcare offers.

    If you are a Critical Worker and having your children cared for in school means you can go to work and help with the current crisis our country is facing, do not hesitate to get in touch about using school for childcare – we went to help in any way we can.

    Yesterday’s blog posts:

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  • CRITICAL WORKER SURVEY

    Published 20/03/20

    Please read the information below and then use the link at the bottom of this post to

    complete our CRITICAL WORKER SURVEY.

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  • School Closure update - URGENT

    Published 20/03/20

    Dear Parents and Carers,

    Overnight, the government have provided guidance regarding the care schools are being asked to provide from Monday for a limited number of children. You will all be aware that all schools in England will be closed from 3.30pm today for the majority of children.

    To help us all plan, the government have published some key principles. The following apply to our school and to all families in England:

    1. PARENTS: If it is at all possible for children to be at home, then they should be.
    2. PARENTS: Parents should not rely for childcare upon those who are advised to be in the stringent social distancing category such as grandparents, friends, or family members with underlying conditions.
    3. PARENTS: Parents should also do everything they can to ensure children are not mixing socially in a way which can continue to spread the virus. They should observe the same social distancing principles as adults.
    4. SCHOOLS: If a child needs specialist support, is vulnerable or has a parent who is a critical worker, then educational provision will be available for them. (Our school will contact you if your child might be classed as vulnerable)

    The government have asked that, as a country, we do what we can to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus. It is clear that we all have a responsibility to help slow the spread of the virus and save lives.

    Urgent actions for all parents and carers:

    • Read the 4 principles above and consider your role in helping slow the spread of the virus.
    • Read the Critical Worker guidance and ‘confirm with your employer that, based on their business continuity arrangements, YOUR specific job role is necessary for the continuation of this essential public service.’
    • Please respond to the survey we will send out by text this morning (as soon as you possibly can) to help us plan our provision from Monday.

    Click here for the Critical Worker list

    Many thanks for your ongoing support – you have helped us considerably over the last few days


    Full government advice: Closure of educational settings: information for parents and carers

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  • Critical Worker Information - Covid-19

    Published 20/03/20

    If your work is critical to the COVID-19 response, or you work in one of the critical sectors listed below, and you cannot keep your child safe at home then your children will be prioritised for education provision:

    Health and social care

    This includes but is not limited to doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff including volunteers; the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector; those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributers of medicines and medical and personal protective equipment.

    Education and childcare

    This includes nursery and teaching staff, social workers and those specialist education professionals who must remain active during the COVID-19 response to deliver this approach.

    Key public services

    This includes those essential to the running of the justice system, religious staff, charities and workers delivering key frontline services, those responsible for the management of the deceased, and journalists and broadcasters who are providing public service broadcasting.

    Local and national government

    This only includes those administrative occupations essential to the effective delivery of the COVID-19 response or delivering essential public services such as the payment of benefits, including in government agencies and arms length bodies.

    Food and other necessary goods

    This includes those involved in food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery as well as those essential to the provision of other key goods (for example hygienic and veterinary medicines).

    Public safety and national security

    This includes police and support staff, Ministry of Defence civilians, contractor and armed forces personnel (those critical to the delivery of key defence and national security outputs and essential to the response to the COVID-19 pandemic), fire and rescue service employees (including support staff), National Crime Agency staff, those maintaining border security, prison and probation staff and other national security roles, including those overseas.

    Transport

    This includes those who will keep the air, water, road and rail passenger and freight transport modes operating during the COVID-19 response, including those working on transport systems through which supply chains pass.

    Utilities, communication and financial services

    This includes staff needed for essential financial services provision (including but not limited to workers in banks, building societies and financial market infrastructure), the oil, gas, electricity and water sectors (including sewerage), information technology and data infrastructure sector and primary industry supplies to continue during the COVID-19 response, as well as key staff working in the civil nuclear, chemicals, telecommunications (including but not limited to network operations, field engineering, call centre staff, IT and data infrastructure, 999 and 111 critical services), postal services and delivery, payments providers and waste disposal sectors.


    Urgent actions for all parents and carers:

    • Read the 4 principles below and consider your role in helping slow the spread of the virus.
    • Read the Critical Worker guidance above and ‘confirm with your employer that, based on their business continuity arrangements, YOUR specific job role is necessary for the continuation of this essential public service.’
    • Please respond to the survey we will send out by text this morning (20th March) to help us plan our provision from Monday.

    To help us all plan, the government have published some key principles. The following apply to our school and to all families in England:

    1. PARENTS: If it is at all possible for children to be at home, then they should be.
    2. PARENTS: Parents should not rely for childcare upon those who are advised to be in the stringent social distancing category such as grandparents, friends, or family members with underlying conditions.
    3. PARENTS: Parents should also do everything they can to ensure children are not mixing socially in a way which can continue to spread the virus. They should observe the same social distancing principles as adults.
    4. SCHOOLS: If a child needs specialist support, is vulnerable or has a parent who is a critical worker, then educational provision will be available for them.

    Full government guidance on Critical Workers – click here

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  • Coping with self-isolation and managing behaviour at home.

    Published 18/03/20

    Keep it the same… as it’s becoming different.

    In times like these, it’s very easy to change the routines, change your general rules about screen time, bedtime, bath time, wake time, snacks or whatever else. Keep a similar schedule from day-to-day and make sure your child gets dressed. Set a wake-up time, a time for lunch, screen time and bedtime. If you can, try to mimic your child’s school day by having periods of time during which certain activities will take place. This will help reduce stress and uncertainty.

    Structuring learning

    If you have a learning pack from school create a visual schedule with times or durations for each activity and follow it throughout the day. You can download blank timetables from the internet or simply make your own.

    • Regular breaks. On your timetable make it one short activity and then have a snack or a physical break just as they would at school. Gonoodle website is great!
    • Pick your battles. If they struggle with an activity do some of it with them so it doesn’t become a battleground. Make it sound fun and interesting.
    • Read books with your child. It's not only fun, but reading together strengthens your bond with your child AND helps their development.
    • Make time for active play. Bring out the blocks, balls, jump ropes and buckets and let the creativity go. Play games that kids of all ages can play, like tag or duck duck goose. Let your kids make up new games. Encourage older kids to make up a workout or dance to keep them moving.
    • Keep an eye on media time. Whenever possible, play video games or go online with your child keeping that time structured and limited. If kids are missing their school friends or other family, try video chats to stay in touch.
    • Have fun. Make one activity a day their fun choice so it could be baking, playing a game with you, making a model together, dressing up, planting seeds, having a teddy bears picnic in the lounge, blowing bubbles or making a den in their bedroom. You could make a jar together and they could fill it with suggestions of activities they would like to do with you in the house and garden.

    Rules

    • Work with your child to draw up some simple rules and expectations for this time.
    • Draw them up as a family so they feel involved.
    • Go for the positive and link them to your reward chart.
    • Display them. Your child could design the poster themselves.
    • Be consistent and fair. Make sure you give warnings and choices. ‘Do your writing with my posh pencil or your pencil.’ ‘When the clock says 7pm the television will go off.’

    Rewards

    Introduce a reward scheme so that you are rewarding positive behaviours. Give your child a tick every time they do the right thing (saying thank you, completing a piece of work, helping their little sister etc) so that after 10 ticks they get a little reward. Make these rewards small such as choosing what’s for tea, choosing the TV programme at 5pm, a sticker, time with you, a favourite story, or save rewards for something bigger. Print a chart from templatelab.com/reward-charts or www.101printable.com-reward-charts-for-kids or make your own.

     

    Reducing anxiety

    • Filter information and give simple reassurance. Remind children that researchers and doctors are learning as much as they can, as quickly as they can, about the virus and are taking steps to keep everyone safe.
    • Give them control. It's also a great time to remind your children of what they can do to help – washing their hands often, coughing into a tissue or their sleeves, and getting enough sleep.
    • Stick to routines. Children may get cranky, be more clingy, have trouble sleeping, or seem distracted. Keep the reassurance going and try to stick to your normal routines.
    • Monitor their media. Keep young children away from frightening images they may see on TV, social media, computers, etc. For older children, talk together about what they are hearing on the news and correct any misinformation.
    • Mindfulness. Try some of the free activities on smilingminds.au or practise simple breathing exercises or squeezes e.g. childhood101.com/fun-breathing-exercises-for-kids, Cosmic Kids on You Tube or Moovee Calming Breathing and Relaxation

    If it goes wrong

    • Give yourself a moment. Controlling the way you act, when you feel like you are at breaking point, is important for you and your children. When you notice an emotional response in yourself do something to take the edge off. Have a cup of tea, go for a walk, play music, have some chocolate, run a bath etc. Model a calm response. Your child will learn from you.
    • Think positive Instead of getting too stressed about your child’s bad behaviour, look out for and reward their good behaviour.
    • Laugh. Humour can take the heat out of a situation and can even make everyone forget about what’s made them angry. Try to see the funny side of things if you can.
    • Use distraction Fetch a new game or offer a snack to change the mood.
    • Strike when the iron is cold. Unless your child is unsafe, wait until you are both calm before dealing with an incident. Giving them a snack and drink first often helps.

    Keeping positive

    • Praise is always better than criticism. Try “You are so good at tidying away. Can you put the Lego in the box before I make your drink?”
    • Use ‘when and then.’ “When you are dressed, then you can get a snack.”
    • Tell them calmly and clearly exactly what you want them to do. “Bottom on the chair, book on the table. Thank you.”
    • Give them some ‘take up time’ and repeat using the same words.
    • Praise specifically. “I like the way you kept going even when you found it tricky.”

    Finally, try and enjoy some precious family time with your child.

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